Monthly Archives: January, 2016

#GCARD3 communications – A call to the good, the willing and the innovators

1. If you are a professional communicator working within the GFAR network, with CGIAR, any of our partners, or a nonprofit organisation within our area of interest, join our core #GCARD3 communications team. You can contribute at will, or just watch and witness a great project coming to fruition, experimenting and learning as we go along.

2. If you are a social media enthusiast, and want to put your own skills and network to a good use, join our YPARD social media team, the habitat where we will coordinate the online support team.

THE GFAR BLOG

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Are you a professional communicator, or a social media enthusiast? Are you part of the GFAR network (the Global Forum on Agricultural Research) or CGIAR (the global agricultural research partnership), or one of its partners? Are you involved in a nonprofit organisation, institute or university working on any aspect of food security, agriculture, sustainable development, or eco-systems,…? Or a young social media enthusiast willing to put your skills into use for the greater good?

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What happens to soil in winter? Does everything die?

Soils Matter, Get the Scoop!

Soil is essential to life. One reason is that soil protects plant roots, animals, and microbes from freezing in the winter. As air temperatures drop below 32F (0C), water within the top layers of the soil will eventually freeze. This is commonly known as the frost layer. So, while you think that once the ground is frozen, life stops in the soil, that’s very untrue. What’s going on under your feet is exciting stuff!

Feet on snowy ground The soil under your feet is still teeming with life, even in the frozen temperatures of winter.

The frost layer can be several feet deep, though many factors influence how far down it goes. If a lot of snow falls on the ground early in the winter, it can serve as a blanket for the soil underneath. Organic matter plays a role in insulating soil, holding in heat stored below ground during the warmer…

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#GCARD3: Global Event to be held in South Africa

The GFAR Secretariat is pleased to announce that the Global Event for the Third Global Conference on Agricultural Research and Development (GCARD3) will be hosted by the Agricultural Research Council (ARC) of South Africa, in Ekurhuleni near Johannesburg, from 5 to 8 April 2016.

Enthusiastic about the opportunity, the South African Minister for Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Honourable Mr. Senzeni Zokwana remarked that, “it is a fitting tribute to the ARC’s global stature to be awarded the right to host the GCARD3 Global Event. This event is expected to be an inclusive, participatory process and will be an opportunity to shape the future of global agricultural research.”

The Global Event, organized by GFAR and the CGIAR, will follow directly on a series of national and regional consultations carried out through 2015-2016, and will be the third such global conference bringing together hundreds of representatives from across all agriculture sectors with a stake in the future of agri-food research and innovation.

This third GCARD Conference comes at a pivotal time for global agenda-setting on development action, as the Sustainable Development Goals demand a concerted effort to eradicate poverty and hunger by 2030–challenges that can be best met by ensuring sustainable food systems and by increasing investment in agriculture. The Conference will provide a forum for those involved in the GCARD process to further engage and make commitments on working together to make agri-food research and innovation systems stronger, more effective, and more sustainable.

Read the official media release on the GCARD3 Global Event.

Agriculture is in every SDG: Part 1

Skimming the eye across the colourful chart of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), it is easy to spot a couple which are intrinsically and directly linked to agriculture, but a closer look reveals that they are in fact all linked to agriculture. A healthy global agricultural sector underpins and supports so many aims of the SDGs that its development will be important for their overall success. As sustainable agriculture is essential for sustainable food systems and livelihoods, here is a breakdown of how agriculture, farming and nutrition fit into the first 7 goals

One Billion Hungry: Can We Feed the World?

By Alice Marks

Story-2-SDGsSkimming the eye across the colourful chart of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), it is easy to spot a couple which are intrinsically and directly linked to agriculture, but a closer look reveals that they are in fact all linked to agriculture. A healthy global agricultural sector underpins and supports so many aims of the SDGs that its development will be important for their overall success. As sustainable agriculture is essential for sustainable food systems and livelihoods, here is a breakdown of how agriculture, farming and nutrition fit into the first 7 goals

1. No Poverty

Over 70% of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas, and rely heavily on agriculture for their survival and livelihoods. According to the World Bank, evidence shows that GDP growth generated in agriculture has large benefits for the poor, and is at least twice as effective in reducing poverty…

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